Music: Suffix - Ghetto Ndi Nyatwa ft. Sho Baraka

Malawian rapper Suffix dropped his single "Ghetto Ndi Nyatwa" with American rapper Sho Baraka.

In December 2017, Baraka, visited the country and had concerts in Blantyre and Lilongwe. Suffix was the right-hand man of the visiting rapper and would open the shows for him. The two became close and a bond was formed that led to this single.



The story behind the song

...He builds it from an understanding of him as a former resident of Chilobwe ghetto in Blantyre.

All is not well there. Ten homes using one pit latrine and crime are the order of the day. They then look at children from well-to-do neighborhoods as not tough enough to hustle for living on their own. They go around boasting and living on their parent’s riches. Real life is said to be in the ghetto, raps Suffix, stepping into the shoes of his former self when he was there. Everyone, including rappers, wants to be associated with the ghetto, places where life is always tough.

Is this all that you deserve? Suffix then brings out his own life story. As a boy formerly from the ghetto, it is possible to rise out from the place. The life experienced directly influences one’s character. Chances of ending up in crime or shunning education are high. But just like him, it is possible to still keep oneself upright and work for the day when you will be out.

He recognizes that for most it is not their own choice to be in the ghetto. But he then faults the trending attitude of normalizing life in such places as the ultimate reflection of what a Malawian youth has to be. There is something better than it. Suffix brings in government as well. It is not giving much attention to what is happening in there. People do not have access to good health services, for example, while when those in authorities can afford to fly overseas for better treatment.

It is never wrong to live in good neighborhoods, in fact, this is actually what we need to be working towards. He raps that he works hard just to make sure his children do not endure the ghetto life he faced. When secular urban music is branding itself as music for the low area's youths, it is time this is put to a stop. This cannot be the only life...


About the Author
Justin Sarachik has been writing about music since 2010 reporting and editing for The Christian Post, BREATHEcast, Broken Records Magazine, and his own blog TheSIBandGuy. When not conducting obscenely long phone interviews he jumps around on stage with his progressive rock/rap band Process of Fusion in Staten Island, NY.

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